Projects with scope: Dundee Climate Fund

Total budget £375,000

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Backyard Botanicals haven for pollinators

2022-11-18  •  5 comments  •  gcstenson  •  Dundee Climate Fund

Dundee has a vast amount of unused green space areas on the doorstep of peoples homes. They are prone to littering, fly tipping, are unloved eyesores in communities, and difficult and costly for the council to maintain. 

Backyard Botanicals in Mid Craigie are neighbours who want to make our neighbourhood a happier, cleaner, healthier place to live. We have been given permission to maintain this unused council greenspace on our doorstep, which can only be accessed through houses which are on its boundary. 

We seek to rejuvenate the area with wildflower, plants, and trees which support our eco systems and improve bio diversity. Our vision with our space is to grow food but also to create a tranquil, colourful haven for insects, animals, birds and bees. We hope to grow local flowers and plants that will support insect pollinators that have been in steep decline due to climate change and habitat loss. In addition to the food that we eat, pollinators support healthy ecosystems that clean the air, stabilise soils, and support other wildlife. 

With investment we would like to use two Polycrub tunnels as they are a community based business dedicated to using recycled materials. "They are designed to withstand extremely strong winds, snow, frost, collisions from air born debris and vandalism". Backyard Botanicals invisage growing long term and any investment on equipment needs to be good quality and built to last.

All of the neighbours involved are determined to create a safe space where not only us but our children and grandchildren can be involved from the beginning, learning about growing food, pollinators and the environment that they helped create on their doorstep. 

Where possible, reusing and upcycling second hand items preventing them going into landfill; using natural materials to create a wildlife corridor; sharing of plants, seeds and cuttings through community engagement. 

We would like the grant money to purchase gardening tools, a lawnmower, 2 polycrubs, fruit trees and wood/materials to build raised beds as some of our neighbours have mobility issues. 

With surplus harvest, we aim to food share with family, neighbours, and local food larders.

We hope to inspire others to rejuvenate their greenspaces in their communities. Looking afresh at neglected sites within their neighbourhood could bring new possibilities for a healthier community and a healthier planet by reducing the carbon footprint on the food we eat and also bringing pride back into the areas where we live.

£9,875
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Fairmuir Community Green

2022-11-17  •  No comments  •  friendsoffairmuirpark  •  Dundee Climate Fund

Watch our VIDEO to find out more about our project!

We are a local community group who have recently taken over the redundant bowling green in Fairmuir Park, in order to establish a community garden.  Thanks to the support of the Dandelion Project (Unexpected Gardens) we have made an excellent start with the community garden.  However, we have much wider ambitions and want to build on the work already started .

Our aims for the future cover two of the criteria in the Climate Fund - Resilience and Community Engagement.

We want to make the garden more productive by growing larger amounts of fruit and vegetables which could donate to those in need and the local community larder.

We want to encourage more people to grow their own food in order to reduce the carbon footprint of the food we eat.

We wish to support our eco systems and bio diversity through types of plants we grow and the gardening methods we use. this would include recycling of green and brown waste through  composting , the use of natural fertilisers; supporting a natural pond and providing homes for birds and bugs.

We hope to increase the numbers of people in the wider community who use the garden by providing a wide range of workshops and community activities.

Dandelions began community engagement by providing free lunches once a week through the summer and we would like to continue this activity.

To achieve our aims we would like to apply for funding for materials to build more planters for the garden and polytunnel, cold frames, a tea/coffee shack and  a mud kitchen for the children. These are the materials we have asked for the immediate future.  We have put in three quotes which vary between a total of £10-12000.

Thank you for considering our bid.  

£12,000
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Victoria Gardens – YYI

2022-11-25  •  No comments  •  faisal.hussein  •  Dundee Climate Fund

  1. Victoria Gardens is a 2600 square metre urban growing and social space on Blackness Road. Victoria Gardens has been awarded the Silver Gilt Certificate and the Its Your Neighbourhood Level 5 Certificate in 2022. Annually the garden supports over 500 visitors/participants ranging from school groups, community organisations, volunteers and students. The Victoria Gardens runs an annual summer club supporting young people over the six weeks over the holidays. Over and above this we run foreign language classes, yoga, arts & crafts groups, weekly garden club, a community fridge and social events. Victoria Gardens has a wild culinary area with common ‘weeds’ that can be used in cooking. The garden also has a compost area to produce its own nutrient rich soil. The garden also produces jams, chutney and teas using organic ingredients from the garden.

 

Our ambitions are to create a sustainable space with an aim for net zero. We will achieve this by installing solar panels and batteries to reduce our energy ouput of 2000kwh per annum, install a water reservoir system collecting rainwater to be used for agriculture, a large polytunnel to increase production of fruits and vegetables from warmer climates. Thus reducing carbon miles through international food transport. The garden would grow local fruit and vegetables over a longer growing period including the winter. Lastly we aim to grow our community fridge by employing a dedicated staff member, he/she will liase with supermarkets, food providers, the Dundee Food Insecurity network and others to ensure a constant supply. This food will then be distributed to local partner organisations, foodbank, support cafes and individuals. This will reduce food waste in the City.

 

YYI is applying to purchase a large polytunnel, solar panels, water butt system and staff costs for running the community fridge

£24,500
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Duntrune Community Garden- SAMH Growing Chrysalis project

2022-11-16  •  1 comment  •  sue.black  •  Dundee Climate Fund

Growing Chrysalis, run by Scottish Association for Mental Health (SAMH) in Dawson Park, are transforming a disused bowling green into a multipurpose community space, directed by local need.

This project will bring people together, encouraging people to form new and stronger connections building community capacity and resilience. The space will create opportunities for the whole community to develop and share skills, to volunteer and to influence and improve this amazing greenspace. In addition SAMH will also deliver targeted sessions with schools, nurseries, colleges, families, intergenerational and disability groups. 

We have already started transforming this unused, chemically treated, barren grass space into a wildlife and human friendly haven. We have set up several no-dig beds, mulched borders with woodchip and created a native wildlife corner, wildflower border and fruit beds, however there is a significant area of lawn that needs further investment.

Our climate change priorities include: -

  • Improving biodiversity by taking wildlife friendly approaches e.g., animal habitats, welcoming insects, rewilding, no chemicals.
  • Using climate resilient growing approaches e.g., perennial vegetables, drought tolerant plants, saving seeds, rainwater collection/irrigation, organic methods.
  • Encouraging recycling, reusing, repurposing and using natural materials wherever possible e.g., seed and plant swaps, plant pot swap, upcycling, buying second hand, sourcing local materials.
  • Supporting visitors and volunteers who face increased climate anxiety, with our experience of delivering mental health support.

We need funding that can push our project forwards and enable investment into the space as a shared community resource for years to come:

  • Polytunnel/food forest/raised beds/tools - So that local residents of Douglas, West Ferry and the wider Dundee community, whatever their income, have access to affordable organic food on their doorstep. This will reduce their climate impact while providing opportunities to learn skills in climate friendly food growing.
  • Composting area - Composting prevents food waste going to landfill while feeding our soil and teaching others how to do this at home.
  • Rainwater catchment/water irrigation system – We want to collect our autumn and winter rainwater and store it for the drier Spring and Summer months, reducing reliance on tap water. This includes a self-watering polytunnel using irrigation from rainwater tanks.
  • Outdoor kitchen/shelter – having opportunities to gather and share food will encourage people to socialise and discuss individual or collective ways to prevent climate change. With a welcoming atmosphere, sharing a table, preparing food together and eating with fresh ingredients we can demonstrate healthy climate-friendly habits that are accessible.

     

£20,725
Youth Climate Strike 2019

The psychology of climate change: Pathways to youth and community action

2022-11-20  •  No comments  •  yacar001  •  Dundee Climate Fund

Globally, young people rate climate change as the most important societal issue (Ojala, 2018), and 77% think the future is frightening, 66% are very or extremely worried, and 45% reporting that their feelings about climate change affects their daily life (Marks et al., 2021). A concept that attempts to capture the psychological impact of climate change is ‘eco-anxiety’, which has diffused into public discourse (see BBC, 2019). Eco-anxiety contains common features of anxiety, such as uncertainty and lack of control (Pihkala, 2020; Stanley et al., 2021) and is conceptualized as a manifestation of the impact of climate change on wellbeing. In a study of adult students, Schwartz et al., (2022) found that engagement in collective action decreased the symptoms of depression related to climate change anxiety. However, Schwartz and colleagues (2022) did not address what it is about collective action that functions as a buffer for climate change anxiety.

We propose a project that would examine ways to engage communities and especially young people around climate change. We believe that this type of engagement will not only raise awareness but also improve resilience and well-being as it relates to the effects of climate change. One important aspect of engaging communities to mitigate climate change is that acting together – and seeing others act – can really affect wellbeing, thus encouraging continued action. Acting together can reduce climate anxiety and create a sense of empowerment, a feeling that in working together, people really can create change. 

We will use a qualitative approach to understand what factors harm or improve people’s psychological wellbeing in the context of climate change, focusing on the roles of identity, intersectionality, collective action, and direct and vicarious (dis)empowerment. Speaking with students and activists, we propose to conduct focus groups with non-activists to explore how their understandings of climate change relate to their wellbeing and empowerment. We will also conduct individual interviews with climate activists to ask people what it is that gets them motivated to make changes in their own lives and also in trying to get others motivated as well. Speaking with both non-activists and activists will provide contrasting perspectives on shared community, identity, and wellbeing. We will partner with local organisations to share this information and find ways to encourage young people in local communities to take part in climate action.

Outputs for this work will come in two forms: community-focused output and academic output. In terms of community-focused output, the project’s primary aim is to provide local stakeholders and local young people the opportunity to discuss their experience of participating (or not) in collective action for climate change. This work will ideally find out ways to better connect these groups, first through a workshop for local organisations, and then through an event that would allow young people in Dundee to connect with those organisations. It could also be beneficial to bring this information to the local council and other local government bodies, and we would do this by preparing a lay report that can be shared publicly. The academic output would involve carrying what we learn in the interviews and focus groups to conferences and academic publications so that further research can be carried out in the future.  

£1612 - total salary for a project assistant to help organise and coordinate interviews, focus groups, and workshops with local stakeholders. Cost calculated for 7.5 hours per month for 12 months, starting 1 June 2023.

£980 - travel and accommodation for project consultation from Dr Sara Vestergren. Dr Vestergren will participate in workshops with local stakeholders.

£1032 - Transcription (group interviews - 5x120min)

£1800 - Transcription (individual interviews - 20x60min)

£600 - Participant incentives (40x15)

Total: £6024

£6,024
Community Food Hub & Freecycle

A Thriving Community, a Thriving Planet

2022-11-24  •  No comments  •  claireashepherd62  •  Dundee Climate Fund

The Community Food Hub & Freecyle group have always believed that local people are the key to reducing carbon emissions and helping to protect the environment. Through the Larder, food waste from major supermarkets is reduced and the Freecycle service has saved tonnes of clothes, toys and household items from inceneration and reduced the need for people to buy new items in the shops. The Freecycle part of our service has gone from a few items on a table to a community resource where people donate as well as take, toys come back after a few months when children get bored with them, clothes come back once they are outgrown, books once they have been read.. For Food Hub customers, we have issued slow cookers to reduce cooking costs and will be shortly starting a 'slow cooker challenge' with customers to cook a slow cooker meal and share the results on our Community WhatsApp page and encourage others to give it a try.

We feel it is now time to take our care for the environment a step further whilst also benefitting local people - a WIN WIN situation. We would like to puchase heated clothes airers as they use considerably less electrcity than a tumble dryer and  hanging wet clothing on radiators as this makes boilers work harder therefore costing more money and creating more emissions. Air Fryers will also help people to reduce energy usage, as will LED light bulbs and draught excluder kits.and reflective radiator panels.

We believe that when a community is struggling with the cost of living crisis , it's patronising to preach about reducing carbon emissions but providing these items will enable people to reduce household energy bills in addition to reducing damage to the environment. This will  therefore help  to create a thriving community that will actively seek out other ways to reduce costs and energy dependancy. This is a project for the long term and aims to go further in, and for, the future.

£14,146
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Community Toolbox

2022-11-25  •  1 comment  •  wendy  •  Dundee Climate Fund

Wellbeing Works is a local mental health charity based in the Wellgate Centre.  The Community Toolbox is their new project.  It is a library of things people in and around Dundee can borrow instead of buying for decorating, DIY, gardening, outdoor events, cleaning, baking, entertaining and more.  This means that people who can't afford to buy these tools and equipment are able to access them, and as a community we are reducing our carbon footprint by borrowing instead of buying items that ultimately end up in landfill sites. We are also building a culture where we share our skills and resources.  Check out the Community Toolbox at dundee.myturn.com 

£13,000
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Douglas Food Cupboard- Energy saving support for local East End residents

2022-11-17  •  No comments  •  hayleybopper68  •  Dundee Climate Fund

Douglas Food Cupboard are a Local Community Group who are providing a local response to tackling food waste and food insecurity in the East End. 

We would like a grant to support our membership, which consists of local residents, to reduce their energy consumption. We would do this by providing 80 of our regular members with an air fryer and 10 LED energy saving lightbulbs each. While this would have economic benefits for our members, they would also be positively contributing to the aim of reducing energy use as both devices are more energy efficient than traditional ovens and lightbulbs. 

To accompany the air fryers we would also provide some ingredients and recipes to encourage our members to increase their confidence in using the device. 

£6,049
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Reducing food waste in Dundee

2022-11-18  •  2 comments  •  lynsey  •  Dundee Climate Fund

Transition Dundee is a community-led social enterprise aiming to make Dundee a more sustainable, happier and healthier place to live through various climate-focussed initiatives. We would like to increase the amount of food saved from going to waste in and around Dundee, through our project 'Dundee West End Community Fridge' and our partnership with the Dundee Community Food Network (DCFN). The Community Fridge has been running since July 2019 and has so far saved over a whopping 220 tonnes of food, approximately 500,00 meals, and the same carbon reduction as planting and growing 11,500 trees! While our project is primarily about reducing food waste, it also offers dignified access to food for those in need because of the environmental focus and the fact that EVERYONE is encouraged to use it. We work closely with the DCFN and would like to share the extra food saved with the 25+ exisitng food projects, ensuring the food is spread across the whole city and many more people are able to benefit from it. We know there is much more food out there to be saved (and many more people in need of food given the cost of living crisis), so with this project we aim to double the amount of food we currently redistribute and there are three ways in which we would like to tackle this:

A Gleaning Group

The Gleaning Network is a network of community groups, organisations and farmers all over the UK who are working to reduce farm-level food waste. The Network exists to bring together and empower communities, enabling them to salvage surplus food left on farms; food which can then be redistributed through the DCFN, primarily benefitting those on a low income. There is not yet a formal Gleaning Group in Scotland, so Dundee would be the first – and we are in a prime position geographically between the produce-rich areas of Perthshire, Angus and Fife.

There are many reasons why farms have surplus – systematic overproduction, cosmetic standards, order cancellations, worker shortages and unpredictable weather. And it’s not always just farms – the Community Fridge team has often been asked to go and pick fruit trees from private gardens in Dundee when the owners are unable which we are not usually able to do. Tthe extra capacity would allow us to help reduce this waste too. The Gleaning Network provides a tried-and-tested toolkit for making sure our supervised visits to local farms are safe, fun and a worthwhile opportunity for local people to learn about where their food comes from, why waste reduction is important for the climate emergency and feed their community.

Electric Van

A second-hand electric van would allow the Community Fridge team to be more flexible and able to collect larger donations from supermarkets and other businesses when the offers are made, as well as to reduce our carbon footprint (by eliminating petrol/diesel car journeys currently made by our collection team). The van would also be used to collect and distribute the large volumes expected from gleaning days – meaning we would be able to take food to other projects in a sustainable way.

Inreased Community Engagement

There is increasing concern from our community about the impact of food waste and we would like to hold more workshops/events to show how small changes can make a big impact to the planet, our health and our bank balance. We would work in partnership with community groups and other organisations across the city to deliver this to reach as many people as possible!

 

£48,857
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Fit For The Future

2022-11-14  •  44 comments  •  finlay  •  Dundee Climate Fund

Significant energy efficiency measures in Dundee community space. Improving the efficiency of an 1888 building through insulation (both attic and underfloor), secondary glazing upgrading, installation of destratification fans (to better direct the heat towards the colder floor level from a 7m height) , solar PV panels and heat distribution measures to reduce carbon emissions by 34% and reduce heating output by 25-30%. The benefits of each have been detailed in an audit for the building. Our peak usage is also in the evening, when most of our classes take place. Battery power will allow us to generate and store during quieter daytime sessions to then allow for storage and use in the evening. Insulation will have a direct effect on the cold pool we have in the centre of our main practice space. Radiator heat goes straight up into our 7m vaulted space. With both insulation and 6 destratification fans, we could move an even heat to the lower levels as seen in the Dundee Rep. With soaring energy costs, we would be better able to direct resources towards maintaining our rich family and outreach programme providing a warm, welcoming and comfortable space.

With soaring energy costs, and reduced household income, and the organisation's core funds coming from community classes, we cannot put up class prices without increasing the pressure on our clients. With outreach classes 6 days a week, our free programmes also feel the effects of comfort and well-being in our space. Sharing our message about energy would also be a large part of our comms for the duration and after the project, as the most significant project we have taken on since our inception.

£50,000